Selenium level in steroid-resistant and steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome

Main Article Content

Sudung Oloan Pardede
Andini Striratnaputri
Muzal Kadim

Abstract

Background The mechanisms of pathogenesis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) are not well understood. Antioxidants, such as glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GPx) and its cofactor, selenium, are thought to slow the progress of nephrotic syndrome (NS).


Objective To compare selenium levels in SRNS and SSNS pediatric patients.


Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 51 SRNS and 30 SSNS patients, aged 2 to 18 years, who visited the Pediatric Nephrology Outpatient Clinic at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta. Subjects were included by consecutive sampling. Selenium was measured on venous blood using GC tools MS ™ (Agilent technologies, inc.).


Results Median selenium levels in SRNS patients were 92 (range 42-154) μg/L and in SSNS patients were 93 (range 69-193) μg/L.


Conclusion Selenium levels in SRNS and SSNS patients were not significantly different.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Pardede S, Striratnaputri A, Kadim M. Selenium level in steroid-resistant and steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome. PI [Internet]. 23Nov.2020 [cited 3Mar.2021];60(6). Available from: https://www.paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/2452
Section
Pediatric Nephrology
Author Biographies

Sudung Oloan Pardede, Department of Child Health, Universitas Indonesia Medical School/Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia- Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

Muzal Kadim, Department of Child Health, Universitas Indonesia Medical School/Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia- Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

Received 2020-07-16
Accepted 2020-11-23
Published 2020-11-23

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